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A friend and I are wanting to go out on our own authority. I drove company OTR for 3 years but he has almost no experience. We figure as soon as we have it down we can get a better truck but for now we are looking to cut our teeth in the game with as low of initial cost as possible. And we want the truck to be paid cash so it won’t hurt us if it sits.

We have several tabs open of early-mid 00’s freightliner century’s for sale in the area. Yesterday we drove one.

It was a 2000 freightliner century for 8000$

The guy claimed the motor was rebuilt at some point but did not have paperwork. I feel like those receipts would be important enough that anyone who owned the truck would want to hang on to them. So idk.

But the truck has 199xxxx miles on it. Almost 2M. So maybe it has been rebuilt, because it had plenty of power and there’s no way that motor would make it to 2M and still run pretty strong without a rebuild right? The guy showed us that the truck had been hauling from TX to PA and back this year. I drove it for about 30 minutes, it drove straight with plenty of power.

What else should we be looking at on a truck with 2M miles?

The tires were not brand new but they seemed fairly new. Good tread.

It had new brakes all the way around. New alternator. New ECU.

Of course the inside was pretty trash. It seems like for 8000 this is what you can expect. And in this price range, I’m inclined to believe that a 8k truck with 2M miles is just as likely to have a major problem as a 15k truck with 1M. Right?

We figure if this first truck holds up for a few weeks we break even. And like I said, at that point maybe we have the confidence to go over to Lone Mointain etc and find a more long term investment.

We are going to look at a few more Centurys this weekend to give us a little perspective. But for our first truck, we liked the 2000 we drove and we think it could be exactly what we need to start out.

Any advice or things to look for if we go back to look a 2nd time would be greatly appreciated.

 

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